Methodology

Fishery Performance Indicators (FPIs) are a rapid assessment instrument for measuring economic, community, and ecological outcomes in the World’s fishery systems. They can be used in both developed (data-rich) and developing (data-poor) regions. They are used to evaluate the effectiveness of investment, reforms, and interventions.

The International Coalition of Fisheries Associations (ICFA) funded the development of Fishery Performance Indicators in 2009. The World Bank has since tested and applied them. The development process involved four workshops and test pilots involving:

Publications and Reports

  1. Anderson J.L., C.M. Anderson, J. Chu, J. Meredith, et al. 2015. The Fishery Performance Indicators: A Management Tool for Triple Bottom Line Outcomes. PLOS ONE 10(5): e0122809. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122809
  2. Chu, J. Garlock, T., Asche, F. and Anderson, J.L. 2017. Impact Evaluation of a Fisheries Development Project. Marine Policy 85 (2017) 141-149.
  3. Chu, J. and J. Meredith. 2014. Economic, environmental, and social evaluation of Africa’s small-scale fisheries. The World Bank Group. Washington DC (54pp).
  4. Anderson, J.L., C. Anderson, T. Garlock and M. DeAlessi. 2016. The Fishery Performance Indicators for California and Indonesia Fisheries Management Systems. Prepared for The David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

What is a Fishery System?

A fishery system is the intersection of three perspectives. The biological perspective is identified by a breeding population. The harvesting business perspective is identified by fleets using comparable technologies and serving similar markets. The management perspective is identified by a common set of rules for access and harvest. In other terms, a fishery system is identified by fleets harvesting identifiable populations, supplying similar markets, and under a common set of rules for access and harvest.

Fishery Performance Indicators

Fishery systems are scored using 68 metrics. These metrics were selected to be readily available, accurate, quantifiable, relevant and understandable. They are rolled up into three indicators: Ecology, Economics, and Community. We are continually adding new fisheries to the FPI system, and are expanding the utility of FPI to assessment of sports fisheries and aquaculture operations.

FPI Strengths

-Triple bottom line assessment – environment, economics, community

-Objective and science-based

-Rapid and cost-effective

-Compares systems – A common language/a common metric

-Support investment/project monitoring and evaluation

-Accommodates data-poor fisheries

-Includes the value chain

Value

Multilateral Banks and Development Organizations (e.g. World Bank, Asia Development Bank, USAID)

These organizations use the FPIs for independent & objective baseline assessment; as a tool to assist in project design; and for monitoring and evaluation.

Government Fishery Management Agencies

These organizations use the FPIs for independent & objective assessment of their management systems.

Environmental NGOs

These organizations use the FPIs for independent & objective baseline assessment; as a tool to assist in project design; and for monitoring and evaluation.

Philanthropic Organizations

These organizations use the FPIs for independent & objective baseline assessment; as a tool to assist in project design and for monitoring and evaluation.

Seafood Users

There is potential for the FPIs to help seafood buyers, chefs, wholesalers and distributors source from sustainable fishery systems.

Academic Community

As an independent and objective data source the FPIs can be used to formally evaluate the effectiveness of management systems and help answer what works. What works best for fisheries? What works best for economic returns, business and employment?  What works best for the community?

 

Fishery Performance Indicators Manual

Individual metrics are scored from 1 to 5. The bins are generally chosen to reflect the quintiles of performance on the metric globally.

Additionally each metric is assigned a quality of the score:

Sample Metric

As an example, the metric Social Standing of Captain is scored as follows.

ScoreDescription
5Among the most respected in the community, comparable with civic and religious leaders or educated professionals
4Comparable to business managers and white collar jobs
3Comparable to skilled labor jobs
2Comparable to unskilled labor or service jobs
1Among the least respected, such as illegal labor, slaves or indentured servants